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Friday Foodie Funnies, ep. 6

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Happy Friday, everybody!  It’s Friday and that means two things:  1)  the weekend is almost upon us, and 2)  more foodie funnies are heading your way.  Now this one really rings true for me.  I’m glad that I’m not the only one!

I'm not like this at all.  Oh wait, yes I am.
I’m not like this at all. Oh wait, yes I am.

Have a safe weekend y’all!  And don’t forget to follow me on Facebook!

Hazelnut Pesto

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Alright, I know that I’ve posted a pesto recipe before.  But this one is different because I used hazelnuts!  Plus I fiddled with the ratios on this one to get a more standardized version.  If you’ve made a pesto before, you understand how easy making this can be.  But you also understand how important it is to use high quality ingredients.  If anything you use is of a lesser quality, you will definitely notice it.

DSC_1469

Now using hazelnuts in this recipe can be slightly problematic, since they do have those pesky husks on them (I am not sure that terminology is right).  It does take some effort to get those things off, but I think it’s worth it.  This recipe makes a big batch.  Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 3/4 c. hazelnuts
  • 5 c. fresh basil leaves, packed tight
  • 5-6 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 c. olive oil
  • juice and zest of 1/2 a lemon
  • 1 c. grated Parmesan
  • salt and pepper, to taste

1.  Roast the hazelnuts in either a preheated 350 degree F oven or in a pan over medium heat.  Roast them until they become fragrant and slightly browned.  Transfer them to a plate and cover with a light towel and allow them to cool.  While they are covered they can steam which helps release them from the husks.  Now rub the nuts with the towel to clean off husks and set aside.

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2.  In a food processor, place hazelnuts and pulse to chop for a few seconds.  Add the basil and pulse again.  Do the same when you add the garlic.

3.  With the food processor running. drizzle in the olive oil to combine.  Add the lemon and pulse for a few seconds.  Transfer to a serving bowl or storage container.  Stir in the Parmesan.  Add salt and pepper to taste.

Just a little shot of pesto!
Just a little shot of pesto!

Notes — I made a batch of Garlic Confit and added a little bit of the infused oil into the pesto.  I didn’t put too much because I just wanted a hint of the flavor.  Maybe I used a couple of tablespoons. . .  I like putting lemon in my pestos which most people don’t.  Maybe it makes it too much like a gremolata for folks.  I just like the brightness it adds, plus it helps keep everything green. . . Roasting hazelnuts is made more idiot-proof because of their husks.  The husks help protect the nuts from burning so even if you get a little charring on the husk, the nut may actually be just fine.

New look and fun with the Beekmans!

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Hey everybody!  Sure it’s been awhile since I’ve here, but it’s another injury-filled couple of weeks for me.  Maybe I should actually rest instead of still playing volleyball for once.  Humbug on that!  Anyhoo, I just have a couple of announcements.

First of all, Jereme’s Kitchen has a whole new look!  It took me awhile to decide on one and I will probably be tweaking it over the next few weeks.  Of course, I could just change it altogether.  I’d appreciate any feedback and thoughts!

Secondly, I got a chance to spend the afternoon with the Fabulous Beekman Boys earlier this month!  And this time they were both here (well, not here exactly, but close enough in Lansing, MI)!  If y’all remember, I was able to attend a reading by Josh Kilmer-Purcell back in April of 2011 when he came back for a visit of his old alma mater (Go Spartans!).  This go around, he came back and he brought his partner Brent Ridge MD with him!  The focus for this talk and book signing was for their new Heirloom Dessert Cookbook.  The recipes they have assembled are a collection of time-honored gems that have been a part of their own family traditions and histories.  Like the previous cookbook, they do leave a space for you personalize the recipes with your own special twist or just leave some notes on what to do.   There is also a space for you to add any family recipes and include it in this heirloom collection.  It’s a nice touch that other cookbooks don’t offer!  And one lucky Jereme’s Kitchen reader might just get their own signed copy to cherish (hint, hint — stay tuned)

Brent and Josh at Schuler's Books in Lansing!
Brent and Josh at Schuler’s Books in Lansing!
These two guys really do seem sweet and genuine.
These two guys really do seem sweet and genuine.

At the book signing, Brent had told me about a blog project that the Boys and Kenn the Biscuit Guy were planning.  So I got to talking with Kenn the Biscuit Guy (there is a very entertaining story about how his name came about, and it involves Martha Stewart!) and he gave me some of the details about it.  The blog is called Bake Like a Beekman over at Blogspot.  What is so great about this is that they will look at one of the recipes in the book, participants will then attempt to create them, and then everyone gets to share their experiences with the recipe.  You can talk about any changes you made, serving suggestions, concerns that you may have, or just share your results.

Here's the Heirloom Dessert Cookbook!
Here’s the Heirloom Dessert Cookbook!

Now the project did already start this past Sunday, with the first recipe being the Walnut Cake.  There are already some results from the participants posted.  A new recipe will be selected every Sunday, and there will be a deadline for submissions.  That way we can all learn everything we can from each other and then all move on to the next recipe!  I think it’s a wonderful project — it’s like we all are taking an online class together.  I look forward to participating and I encourage y’all to join in too!  If you do decide to partake, tell Ken-with-two-“N”s that Jeremy-with-an-“E” sent ya!

Fun fact that I learned from the Beekman Boys on Facebook -- Josh spent some time working at the State News (the school paper and Michigan State).  While there he had to design an ad for the college book store.  His handwriting was used as the design for the neon of The Student Book Store.
Fun fact that I learned from the Beekman Boys on Facebook — Josh spent some time working at the State News (the school paper at Michigan State). While there he had to design an ad for the college book store. His handwriting was later used as the design for the neon of The Student Book Store.

Boycott Barilla

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Just passing this post along from fellow local blogger at Last One Eating. This story has been making the rounds for a bit and I see that the company is trying to do some damage control now. People are free to believe whatever they want, but people are also free to express their displeasure with a boycott. There are many alternatives to Barilla products out there, some of them are even local! Personally, I like what the Beekman Boys have put out since 25% of their profits will go back to help small farmers. Sure it’s not local (at least not in SE Michigan), but Josh Kilmer-Purcell is a Michigan State grad. Go Spartans!

Last One Eating

Yet again there is another food related foot in mouth incident of bigotry. The food world had just been through the Paula Deen drama.

Now Guido Barilla, of Barilla Pasta has jumped on the anti-gay bandwagon .

You probably have a box of Barilla pasta in your home right now. I did.

From the Independent by Michael Day 

Guido Barilla, whose firm has almost half the Italian pasta market and a quarter of that in the US, told Italy’s La Zanzara radio show last night: “I would never do an advert with a homosexual family…if the gays don’t like it they can go an eat another brand.

“For us the concept of the sacred family remains one of the fundamental values of the company.”

He added: “Everyone has the right to do what they want without disturbing those around them”. But then the pasta magnate upped the ante by attacking…

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Friday Foodie Funnies, ep. 5

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Hey y’all!  I’ve had a weird week, and not in a good way.  I had a weird interview followed by back-to-back days of unrelated volleyball injuries.  Huzzah!  Well, watching this video made me feel better.  It is fall and if you remember my post from a couple of weeks back, it is time for Pumpkin-Spice everything!  This video shows how some people might feel about that.  And yes, I did post this on Facebook yesterday, but I liked it so much I wanted to share it here.

 

Friday Foodie Funnies, ep. 4

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Now it’s probably too late in the season for corn, but getting some fresh corn is absolutely amazing.  If you’re still in season, head down to your farmer’s/farmers market and get yourself some.  Here’s an old post of mine with a recipe for some corn on the grill.

I'm not 100% sure that I agree, but I do love fresh corn!
I’m not 100% sure that I agree, but I do love fresh corn!

And just a reminder for folks, these are just some images that I either find on the Interwebs or that have been sent to me.  So I do not own them and will gladly take them down if it becomes problematic.  Just don’t be jerks about it.  You know who you are.

I’m on Facebook, too!  Happy Friday, y’all!

Lemon Macarons

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Now I’ve done a lot of research on macaroons.  Alright, it’s not like I’ve done a dissertation on the topic but I’ve done comparisons on lots of different recipes.  And what I’ve found is that all the recipes are pretty much exactly the same.  Well, not exactly — they do differ on different flavorings and whatnot.  But since the base recipe is pretty simple and standard, you can get a little creative with flavorings.

I admit, this is not my best batch ever.  Guess I'm out of practice.
I admit, this is not my best batch ever. Guess I’m out of practice.

Of course, “lemon” isn’t exactly creative, but I had some lemons in the fridge already so that was an easy choice for me.  Plus, the zest won’t really change the moisture content of the ingredients.

But let me backtrack a little bit.  If you don’t know what macarons are, they are those really colorful, round, meringue-based, French cookies that looks so intimidating to make but really aren’t.  They have some specific requirements though.  Anyhoo, here’s what you’ll need. . .

Still, some turned out okay.
Still, some turned out okay.

For the cookies:

  • 3/4 c. almond flour
  • 1 c. powdered sugar
  • 2 egg whites
  • pinch of cream of tartar
  • 1/4 c. superfine sugar
  • zest of 1/2 lemon
  • yellow food coloring (optional)
  • lemon oil (optional)

1.  Line a sheet pan with parchment paper or a silicone mat.Sift together the almond flour and powdered sugar together twice.  Set aside.

2.  In the bowl of a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, start to whip until foamy.  Then add the cream of tartar and whip until soft peaks.

3.  Once you get soft peaks, start gradually adding the superfine sugar with the mixer on low.  Then continue to whip on high after all the sugar has been incorporated until you get stiff peaks.  Add the food coloring and lemon oil (if using) and whip until combined.

4.  Add the zest and flour mixture in three batches, folding well each time.  Continue folding until the mixture is smooth and shiny.

5.  Transfer the mixture to a piping bag fitted with a 1/2-inch round tip.  Pipe into small circles, about 3/4 inches across.  Rap the pan on the counter to release any bubbles (I don’t think I did that hard enough this time).  Now let sit at room temperature for about 30 minutes.

6.  Bake in a preheated oven at 325 degrees F for 10 – 15 minutes, until the edges are slightly browned.  Cool for about 10 minutes on the pan, then peel off parchment and transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely.  Set aside whilst you make the filling.

I like smaller macarons.  They're cute!
I like smaller macarons. They’re cute!

For the filling:

  • 8 oz. cream cheese
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • zest of 1/2 lemon
  • 1/4 c. superfine sugar
  • 1 t. vanilla

In the bowl of a mixer using the paddle attachment, combine the cream cheese, lemon juice, lemon zest, sugar, and vanilla.  Mix until smooth.

Assemble the cookies by matching up similarly sized cookies.  Spread a small amount of the filling on one of the matching pair and sandwich them together.  Serve immediately.

I found this on the interwebs (the website is in the bottom corner of the pic).  Hope the pic helps clear up any confusion.
I found this on the interwebs (the website is in the bottom corner of the pic). Hope the pic helps clear up any confusion.

Notes — I could not find the piping tip that I needed so these didn’t exactly look the way I wanted. . . Try not to diddle with them too much after you pipe them. . . Now I made a lot of filling for this (again, I had a brick of cream cheese available) — just cut it in half, or just make a double batch of cookies, or just use it to make a cheesecake, or schmear it on a bagel. . . I have read that you should age your egg whites.  Not sure why.  Haven’t done it before.  Maybe I’ll try that out just to see what differences there are. . . I’m also not sure you’ll need the cream of tartar, but whenever I make a meringue I always throw some in there. . .