German Chocolate Cake, pt. 2

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German Chocolate Cake

Remember when I posted about Michigan’s birthday and having a German Chocolate Cake?  Turns out I never posted a recipe.  So here it is!  What I came up with is a conglomeration of several different recipes that I’ve collected over the years and I honestly am not sure from whom I’ve adapted this.  A chocolate frosting is included here, which is optional (some folks don’t like a frosting on their German Chocolate Cakes).  This recipe makes 2 9-in. cakes or 3 6-in. cakes.  All the pics that I show here are for a 6-in. cake.  Here’s what you need:

For the cake:

  • 3/4 c., plus 2 T. Dutch process cocoa powder
  • 1/2 c. boiling water
  • 1/2 c. canola oil
  • 4 eggs, separated, plus 2 egg whites
  • 1 t. vanilla extract
  • 1 c. all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 c. cornstarch
  • 1 1/2 c. sugar
  • 1 t. baking soda
  • 2 t. baking powder
  • 1/4 t. salt

1.  Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.  Butter and coat the sides and bottom of the pans with cocoa, tapping out the excess.  Then line with parchment rounds.

2.  In the bowl of a mixer, whisk together the cocoa and boiling water by hand.  Cover with plastic and bring to room temperature, about 30 minutes.  Then add the oil and egg yolks.  Start on low speed and gradually increase to medium, where you would mix for about one minute, scraping the bowl as needed.  Chocolate mixture should be smooth and shiny.  Beat in vanilla.

3.  In a medium bowl, sift together the flour, cornstarch, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.  Add half of the dry ingredients to the chocolate mixture and mix on low until just combined.  Scrape down the sides and add the rest of the flour.  Beat on medium-high speed for about 1 minute, again scraping the sides as needed.

4.  On low speed, add the egg whites.  Gradually raise the speed to medium-high and beat for 2 minutes.  Divide the batter evenly among the pans.  Bake for about 30 minutes, or until a tester comes out clean.  Unmold the cakes immediately, remove the parchment, and cool on racks.

For the filling:

  • 1 c. heavy cream
  • 1 1/4 c. sugar
  • 4 large egg yolks, lightly beaten
  • 1 stick butter, cubed
  • 1 t. vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 c. sweetened flaked coconut
  • 1 1/4 c. chopped toasted pecans

1.  In a medium saucepan, combine the cream, sugar, yolks, and butter.  Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the butter melts and the mixture thickens and bubbles.  Reduce to low and cook for 2 more minutes.

2.  Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the vanilla (the mixture will bubble), coconut, and pecans.  Cool for about an hour, or until mixture becomes spreadable.  If the mixture is still loose, add some coconut and pecans to thicken the filling.  This can be stored in the fridge for about 2 weeks.

For the frosting:

  • 8 oz. bittersweet or semi-sweet chocolate, chopped
  • 2 T. light corn syrup
  • 3 T. unsalted butter
  • 1 c. heavy cream

1.  To make the icing, place the chopped chocolate in a bowl with the corn syrup and butter.

2.  In a medium saucepan, heat the cream to scalding.   Remove it from the heat and pour over the chocolate.  Let stand for 1 minute, then stir until smooth.  I always have a double boiler waiting just in case it needs some help with melting.

3.  Chill until it’s a spreadable consistency.

Assemble the cake:

1.  Using a serrated knife, cut the cakes in half to make two rounds from each cake.  You may need to level off the tops.  In the center of a cake round or serving plate, place a spoonful of the filling to help hold the cake steady.  Place the bottom half of a cake cut-side up.  Spread some of the coconut filling on top, using a palette knife to push it out to the edges (I use about 1/2 c. for a 6-in. cake.  If making a 9-in. cake, use 1/4 of the filling).

2.  Cover with the top of the cake and alternate layers of filling and cake.  If you’re using the frosting, I like to wait to just mound the final layer of filling on top after I frost the cake and top it with some pecan halves.  Otherwise, just spread the top of the cake with some of the coconut mixture.

3.  Again, this is optional, but you can use an off-set spatula or palette knife to frost the sides and top of the cake.  I like a textured finish, but if you want a smooth & shiny look to the cake, heat your palette knife or spatula in some hot water and run it along the sides of the cake.  You can also put a decorative border around the bottom and top edges of the cake.

Notes — I have seen versions where you can lightly brush the cake layers with some flavored syrup, with rum being the most common.  I don’t use that in this recipe, but I am all for boozing up!. . . If you make a 6-in cake, you will have one left over.  You can just freeze that and have it ready for some other time.  Right now, I have two in my freezer so all I need to do is make a quick filling, and I got a cake all ready to go!. . . hope the directions were clear because, I am a little fuzzy since it is almost 3:00 am as I write this.  Just let me know if there are any questions and I will get to them after I take a long nap.

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5 thoughts on “German Chocolate Cake, pt. 2

    Edyth Miles said:
    February 24, 2012 at 11:08 am

    Wow, that looks amazing!

    Rufus' Food and Spirits Guide said:
    February 25, 2012 at 11:58 am

    Dude, no fair. My list of must make cakes from you is already too long.

    Ragamuffin Diaries said:
    February 27, 2012 at 6:12 pm

    WOW! That is incredibly gorgeous. You are quite a talented cake-maker!

      Jereme's Kitchen responded:
      February 27, 2012 at 10:11 pm

      i still have a lot of work to do, but thank you for your kind words

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