Peachy Scones

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There’s still some last grasps of summer up here in the midwest.  Today may be the last “warm” day we get for a while — it got all the way up to 76 F today, which is way better than the 105 that we got over the summer.  And although autumn is pretty much here (which is my favorite time of the year), I still want summer to hang around for just a little bit.  So that brings me to some peaches.

Now originally some peaches were picked up at the store cuz they were really on sale (which is grocery-speak for “ready to spoil”) and I got inspired.  Initially one thing popped into my head — Peach Soufflé!  But I wanted a quick easy fix so that recipe will have to wait for another time.  So what’s next? — scones!  But apparently I figured it out too late and those peaches did end up spoiling.  I was still inspired so I went to the store and got some new, not quite so nearly-rotten-but-still-sellable as the old peaches.

This was taken from the King Arthur Flour website.  I made some minor changes, but it still stays true to the original.  I did follow a couple of suggestions:  1) to just drop some of the batter into a greased muffin tin, and 2) cut the amount of nutmeg in half — it originally called for 1 t. of nutmeg.  It doesn’t make for the prettiest scone, but it makes it a little easier to divide the portions out, at least for me.  Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1/4 c. granulated sugar
  • 1/2 t. nutmeg
  • 1/2 t. galangal
  • 1 T. baking powder
  • 1 stick cold butter, cut into pieces
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/3 c. sour cream
  • 1/2 t. vanilla extract
  • 1 c. diced peaches, fresh or canned
  • 2 tablespoons coarse sugar

1.  Preheat your oven to 375°F. Lightly grease a divided scone pan, a 12-cup muffin pan, or a baking sheet.

2.  In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, salt, sugar, nutmeg, and baking powder. Cut in the butter, using your fingertips, a fork or a pastry blender.

3.  In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, yogurt or sour cream, and the almond extract. Stir this mixture into the dry ingredients. Add the peaches and stir just until everything is well-combined. This is a wet, sticky dough, good for drop scones.

4.  Divide the dough among the compartments of the scone pan, or drop by the scant 1/4 cupful into the cups of a muffin pan or onto a baking sheet. Sprinkle the scones with coarse sugar, and bake them until they’re golden brown, 15 to 18 minutes (on a baking sheet), or 18 to 20 minutes (in a pan). Yield: 8 to 12 scones.

Notes — The original calls for 6 T. of butter, but I was using some low-fat sour cream so I added the last two from the stick to call it even.  Not sure if that makes everything square, but it tidies everything up — I didn’t want 2 T. of butter lying around the kitchen just waiting for some toast.

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7 thoughts on “Peachy Scones

    frugalfeeding said:
    September 22, 2011 at 10:39 am

    Oh yum, this sounds like a really tasty recipe!

      Jereme's Kitchen responded:
      September 22, 2011 at 5:45 pm

      i really did like the taste of them. too bad i didn’t really try to make them “pretty”

    Heather Dagenais said:
    September 22, 2011 at 10:44 am

    yum – they sound and look delicious!!!

    Rufus' Food and Spirits Guide said:
    September 22, 2011 at 12:45 pm

    Looks great to me. I love nutmeg, but a little goes a long way.

      Jereme's Kitchen responded:
      September 22, 2011 at 5:48 pm

      i agree about the nutmeg. using too much and it kinda takes over everything.

    Mel said:
    September 22, 2011 at 8:53 pm

    Dammit, I even had to look up a word in a SCONE recipe (galangal)! One day I won’t have to use the dictionary to read one of your recipes! Peach scones sound great though ! 😉 –Mel

      Jereme's Kitchen responded:
      September 22, 2011 at 11:39 pm

      in case you didn’t know, galangal is a kinda like ginger. you can get some fresh galangal at whole foods. it’s kinda more citrusy than ginger, and doesn’t quite have that same kind of up front intensity. it’s more on the organic side as opposed to the spicy side.

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