Month: May 2011

Scraps = Quick Mini Black Currant Walnut Galette

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Quick review — my last post was for a custard pie.  And if you remember, one of the steps involved trimming the edges of the crust to fit the pan.  If you’re like me, you don’t like to waste things, so hopefully you didn’t just toss the extra away.  Just take all the trimmings and reform them into a ball, refrigerate, and re-roll them out.  This is so quick and simple; honestly, this took me five minutes to do (not counting cooking time).  It’s the perfect little treat that you can have for yourself after a long day of toil and labor, or your honey when said honey comes home from work (if they are lucky enough to have a job cuz in this economy it seems like everyone is out of work).  Or this can be a treat for just one of those do-nothing days where changing your underwear can seem like a task!  But I digress. . . you really shouldn’t have to do any shopping for this one cuz all this stuff can come from your pantry.

Now I was on the fence with this one — sweet or savory?  I did have a jar of roasted peppers that I could have used and then crumbled some cheese on top.  I settled on being lazy (it is a galette, of course!) and went with the black currant galette.  For some reason, dealing with cheese was too labor intensive; keep in mind that I was dealing with that custard pie at the same time.  Plus it was getting late in the day and the dogs were wanting to go out for a little running around / bathroom time.  So lazy it is!

Here’s what you need:

  • trimmings from a pie crust gathered into a ball and chilled
  • flour for dusting
  • about 1/4 c. black currant jelly
  • 1 T. chopped walnuts
  • 1/2 T. shredded coconut

1.  Preheat oven to 350.  Dust rolling surface with flour.  Roll out your trimmings into a round about 1/8 inch thick.  Transfer to a lined pan.

2.  Spread the black currant jelly over the round, leaving about a 1/2 inch border around the edges.  Sprinkle the walnuts and coconut over the jelly.

3.  Fold the edges over, pleating as you go.  Bake in the oven until the filling is bubbly and the crust is slightly browned, about 20 – 30 minutes.  Let the galette cool before serving.  Dust with confectioners’ sugar if you wish.

Yolks, Yolks, and more Yolks. . . plus an Egg Custard and Nutmeg tart

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So I’ve been working on making some cupcakes for the past couple of days (maybe I’ll post something on that later).  What I originally planned to use with those cupcakes was a nice swiss meringue buttercream.  I was going to divide the basic batch in half or maybe thirds, and then tint and flavor them accordingly.  And since it’s a meringue, that meant just using the egg whites.

Fast forward to the part when you add the butter, and guess what happened next.  Well, the minute I added the butter, everything just deflated.  I thought, “That’s weird.  It’s not like I’ve never made this before.”  So fast forward to take two and lo and behold, the same thing happened.  That meant a change of plans.  It also meant that I had 26 egg yolks that were just kinda hanging out in the refrigerator (10 for each batch of buttercream, plus 6 from a batch of 7-minute frosting that I made as a replacement).

Now what do you do with that many egg yolks?  I didn’t have the foggiest idea.  The only thing that I could come up with was making maybe a gallon of lemon curd which wasn’t the best solution (in my opinion).  So after doing some searching, I came across a recipe for a Classic Egg Custard Pie with Lots of Nutmeg on Martha Stewart’s website.  It looks fairly simple, plus it uses 12 egg yolks!  Of course, I’ll still need to make a lemon curd anyway.  Or maybe a lime curd.

A couple of caveats — I didn’t have the correct pan so I had to improvise.  Since I didn’t have the correct pan, I had lots of extra filling.  So I just decided to have a couple of small baking dishes (which I use for baked eggs — I’ll post on that later) and an old ramekin act as stand-ins without crusts.  I also didn’t bother with the “sweet pastry dough” that was listed in the ingredient list.  I already had some pate brisee in the freezer so I just used that.  Plus, I didn’t have a vanilla bean hanging around, but I did have some vanilla extract. . .  Also, I didn’t have enough cream so I added a little roux to the mix.  Oh yeah, and some of the measurements could be a little off cuz some of the yolks had broken so there might be a little bit more in what I made.  Oops.  Wow — that’s lots of changes.  And I forgot; I don’t have arrowroot, so I used corn starch.

Here’s you’ll need for my version (but check out Martha’s at the link I listed earlier):

  • all-purpose flour for dusting
  • 1/2 pate brisee recipe (check out my earlier post)
  • 1 t. vanilla extract
  • 1 1/2 c. heavy cream
  • 2 1/2 c. whole milk
  • 1 t. flour
  • 1 t. butter
  • 12 egg yolks at room temperature
  • 1/2 c. granulated sugar
  • 2 t. cornstarch
  • 1/4 t. ground nutmeg, plus more for dusting
  • confectioners’ sugar for dusting

1.   Preheat oven to 350.  On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to about a 1/8 inch thick round.  Place in a 9″ tart pan that was lined with parchment on the bottom.  Trim off excess crust (save the trimmings — form them into a ball and put them in the fridge or freezer).  Blind bake for 12 minutes, remove pie weights (or rice or beans) and bake for about 25 minutes until golden brown.  Place pan on a wire rack to cool.

2.  In a medium sauce pan, melt the 1 t. of butter with the 1 t. of flour.  Cook for about a minutes on medium and gradually add the milk while stirring to combine.  Add the cream and vanilla and bring the mixture to a simmer.  Remove from heat, cover, and set aside for 10 minutes.

3.  Whisk together yolks and granulated sugar in a large bowl until pale and thick, about 2 minutes.  While still whisking, add warm cream mixture gradually.  Add the cornstarch and nutmeg and whisk until smooth.  Pour through a mesh strainer into the crust.

4.  Bake until edges of filling are set but center is still slightly wobbly, about 40 minutes.  Cool completely in the pan on a wire rack.  Refrigerate for at least 4 hours (or overnight).  Before serving, unmold, sprinkle with nutmeg, and dust with confectioners’ sugar.

Dry Rub

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So, May is National BBQ Month (I have already mentioned this in a couple of previous posts).  When a lot of people think of a BBQ, it usually involves some family and friends in the backyard, ice cold drinks, maybe a couple of dogs running around, all revolving around someone managing the grill.  Depending on who you talk to, this is not a BBQ, but in fact grilling.  Grilling is a method of cooking done over a direct flame and high heat.  To purists, BBQ takes hours, slow roasting cuts of meat at a low temperature (low and slow!), all done in a smoker or a pit.  Some are wet (dripping in a variety of sauces) while others use a dry rub.

And what is a dry rub?  Essentially, it’s a dry marinade.  It is a mixture of salt, sugar, and spices that is rubbed on the outside before roasting.  Everything is allowed to marinate for several hours which draws out a lot of moisture which, in turn, concentrates the flavor of the meat.  This also draws in a lot of the flavor of the marinade.

Now, I like this kind of stuff a little on the sweet side, so this recipe has more sugar than most (I do have a rub that is a lot more spicy, too).  It works well when used on the grill because the sugar helps to give a nice caramelized coating on whatever you are grilling, meat, veggies, or otherwise.  This recipe does make a lot, but it should last you the whole grilling season (depending on where you live and how much you use).   It might seem needlessly complicated, but every ingredient does do its part.

Here’s what you need:

  • 10 T. brown sugar
  • 3 T. salt
  • 1 T. chili powder
  • 1 T. cocoa
  • 1 T. ground coffee
  • 1 t. paprika
  • 1 t. galangal
  • 1/2 t. dry mustard
  • 1/2 t. onion powder
  • 1/2 t. garlic powder
  • 1 t. chili flakes
  • 1 t. whole anise
  • 1 t. celery seed
  • 1 t. whole coriander
  • 1 t. whole cloves
  • 1 t. cumin

In the bowl of a food processor, combine the brown sugar, salt, chili powder, cocoa, coffee, paprika, galangal, mustard, onion powder, and garlic powder.  In a dry saute pan, toast the chili flakes, anise, celery seed, coriander, cloves, and cumin.  Add to the rest of the ingredients to the food processor and pulse until a fairly uniform powder is formed and the dry rub is cool.  Store in an air tight container.

Note — this is something that I came up with after lots of trials.  There’s a lot of ingredients, so I suggest just trying to simplify things and just go with a basic dry rub.  Start with just the brown sugar, salt, and chili powder.  Add stuff as you go and see what you like.

Rhubarb Sodas and Rhubarb Juleps

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I got the inspiration for this from the blog Coconut & Lime.  There was a post with a recipe for a Rhubarb Soda which sounded so simple and so good.  It was one of those “How-can-this-fail?” kind of things.  Now most likely, I will be trying this later today.  #1 — it sounds delicioso.  #2 — there is fresh rhubarb in the house (hopefully there will be some leftover from a rhubarb upside-down cake which will also be happening later today).  Plus it’s a perfect accompaniment to a nice outdoor BBQ (after all, it is National BBQ Month).

But since we just had the Kentucky Derby. . . was it the Kentucky Derby?. . . it was the one with the hats and the Mint Juleps.  Anyhoo, I thought to myself, “Hey, what about a Rhubarb Julep?”  Now aside from the rhubarb part, my recipe strays from the traditional julep in that I add a splash of club soda to give the drink some fizz and to help balance it out.  Too often I’ve had mint juleps that have been either too sweet or too boozy (which is weird cuz I do drink bourbon straight).  The club soda helps round everything out without just watering the drink down.  So you really could think of this as a Rhubarb Soda with some bourbon in it.

So what can I tell you about rhubarb?  I actually don’t know a lot, but one website (The Rhubarb Compendium) has a whole gaggle of info.  Its roots can be traced back to ancient China with records dating back to almost 5000 years ago, give or take a couple of centuries.  It was used for its medicinal purposes, primarily as a, um, cleanser.  Today we pretty much consider it a pie plant.  But here is a nice way of using rhubarb without having to make a pie.

Here’s what you need for the soda:

  • 4 stalks rhubarb (chopped)
  • 1 c. sugar
  • 1 c. water
  • club soda
  • ice

1.  Combine rhubarb, sugar, and water into a medium saucepan.  Bring to a boil, then lower the heat to low until the sugar dissolves.  Cook for about 10 minutes to reduce.  Run through a strainer, pressing the rhubarb through to get all the syrup.

2.  In a glass of ice, pour about 1 T. of the syrup (or however much you want).  Top off with club soda and stir.

Here’s what you need for the julep:

  • 1 part prepared rhubarb syrup
  • 2 parts bourbon
  • crushed ice
  • tonic water or club soda

Place ice in a glass.  Pour about 1 oz. of the syrup over the ice.  Add the bourbon.  Top off with tonic water and stir.

Blueberry Crumb Cake

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There’s nothing like a good crumb cake to make a brunch special.  Who doesn’t like crumb cake?  Apparently lots of folks.  It’s not that they don’t like crumb cake, it’s that they don’t really know what it is.  Turns out, crumb cake is a regional dish, particular to the East Coast / New England area.   Here’s a little blurb on it from The Food Maven.  It has roots in Northern and Central Europe, possibly Poland or Germany (it is a streusel topping, after all).  Plus when you think of a Dutch Apple Pie, you think about its streusel crumb topping.  The Dutch are from Northern Central Europe, right?

Getting back to the regional cuisine bit– remember your American history from high school?  The Germans and the Dutch had a lot of influence in the area (New Amsterdam was the name of New York before it became New York).  So when they came here, they brought their food traditions.  Although it’s weird that it remains a New England thing.  The Germans, Dutch, and Scandinavians did immigrate to other parts of the country, like the MidWest and Great Lakes region.  For example, there is a lot of Finnish culture in the upper peninsula of Michigan, which now makes me crave some Nisu (It’s a Finnish bread that’s flavored with cardamom and I was able to track some down on my last trip to Houghton-Hancock.  There’s also a great seafood restaurant up there, BTW.  Of course, I could just be a sucker for all-you-can-eat fish.).  But I digress…

I know right now you’re asking, “how is a crumb cake different from a coffee cake?”  Well, let me tell you.  It all has to deal with the amount of streusel on the top.  Coffee cakes might have just a little bit of the streusel.  But the topping could take up a majority of the cake in a crumb cake.  And the topping is the best part!  Well, the rest of the cake is tasty, too.

And that’s a whole bunch of Cultural Nuggets for ya!  A couple of notes before you start:  this recipe has both baking soda and baking powder.  The baking soda is there to help neutralize the acid in the sour cream.  This recipe also uses blueberries, but you can use any kind of berry.  I’ve also see recipes for rhubarb crumb cakes and apple crumb cakes.  There’s also some that just use jam.  And now for the recipe.  It should make one 10-inch cake.  Here’s what you’ll need:

For the topping:

  • 1/4 c. sugar
  • 1/4 c. brown sugar
  • 1 t. cinnamon
  • 1/4 t. galangal (if you don’t have it available, just omit or use a little bit of nutmeg)
  • 1 1/3 c. all-purpose flour
  • 1 stick melted butter

Combine the dry ingredients together in a bowl.  Pour the melted butter over the top and mix with a spoon to form large crumbles.  Set aside.

For the cake:

  • 3/4 c. all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 c. whole wheat flour
  • 1 t. baking powder
  • 1/2 t. baking soda
  • 1/2 t. salt
  • 1 stick butter, room temperature
  • 1/4 c. sugar
  • 1/2 c. honey
  • 1 t. vanilla
  • zest of 1/2 lemon
  • 2/3 c. sour cream
  • 1 pt. fresh blueberries

1.  Preheat the oven to 350.   Spray the pan with cooking spray and line with a parchment round.  Set aside.  Sift together the flours, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.  Set aside.

2.  In the bowl of a mixer, cream together the butter, sugar, and honey.  Mix for about 5 minutes to make sure everything is well incorporated.  Add vanilla, lemon zest, and sour cream.  Stir to combine.

3.  On low speed, gradually add flour and mix until just combined.  Gently fold in the blueberries.  Spoon batter into the pan and level it off.  Evenly top with the streusel.

4.  Bake for 45 -60 minutes until center is done.  Let cool completely.

Raspberry Rhubarb Galette

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So here’s one recipe where you can use the Pate Brisee.  Now remember, that recipe makes enough for a double crust pie, so all you will need is half of that for this one.  Or, you could make two different Galettes cuz they won’t last long 🙂

A “galette” might sound super fancy, but it’s really not.  Essentially, it’s pie for people who really don’t want to be bothered with making a pie.  You don’t even need a pie pan!  Just put in a mound of filling in the center and just fold up the edges to make the sides.  Very rustic.

So, this particular recipe is for a sweet free-form tart, but there are also savory types.  I do have a recipe for a Mushroom Galette using different types of wild mushrooms, a nice stilton, leeks, caramelized onions, and some thyme.  I’ll post that at a later date.

Here’s what you’ll need:

  • 1/2 Pate Brisee recipe
  • 1 pt. raspberries (I used 1/2 red and 1/2 golden)
  • 1 c. rhubarb, cut into about 1/2 in. pieces (about the size of the raspberries)
  • 1/2 c. sugar
  • 2 T. cornstarch
  • pinch of salt
  • egg wash (1 egg whisked with 2 T. milk or heavy cream)
  • sanding sugar

1.  Preheat oven to 375.  Place raspberries and rhubarb in a medium-sized bowl.  In a separate bowl, blend together the sugar, salt, and cornstarch.  Gently fold in the sugar mixture into the fruit.  Let stand for 15 – 20 minutes; if it sits too long, the rhubarb could get too mushy.

2.  Roll out the half of the Pate Brisee to about a 12-in round.  Pour the fruit into the center of the crust, leaving about 1 1/2 in border.  Gently fold up the sides to form pleats; you can pinch them to seal.  Brush the crust with the egg wash and dust with the sanding sugar.

3.  Bake for about 45 minutes, until the crust is golden.  Let cool slightly.  Slice and serve with maybe a slightly sweetened whipped cream with some lemon zest.  Vanilla ice cream is also a good accompaniment and maybe a sprig of mint.

Pate Brisee / Pie Crust

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I know I was planning on making some posts about mother’s day brunch ideas, but life happens.  So hopefully better late than never.  So this is a simple pate brisee recipe for both sweet and savory pies (I will be using this crust recipe for a Raspberry Rhubarb Tart that I will be making and posting later).  You can add maybe about 1 tablespoon of sugar to the dough for just a little added touch of sweetness if you are making a fruit tart or apple pie.  If you are making a more savory pie, just omit the sugar.

My recipe uses both butter and shortening to get that combination of flakiness and tenderness.  You can keep this in the refrigerator for a couple of days, or in the freezer for a month or two.  Since you can freeze it, you might as well make a couple of batches so you can whip up pies and tarts with no problem.  If you do freeze it, thaw it out in the refrigerator overnight to use the next day.  It’s important that all the ingredients are cold; you could even put the mixing bowl and processor blade in the freezer to chill them.  This should be enough for one 9-in double crust pie.  Here’s what you need:

  • 2 1/2 c. all-purpose flour
  • 1 t. salt
  • 1 T. granulated sugar
  • 1 1/2 sticks cold butter, cubed
  • 4 T. shortening
  • 1/3 c. ice water, give or take a couple of tablespoons

1.  Place the flour, salt, and sugar in the bowl of a food processor (you can do this by hand if you wish).  Pulse for a couple of seconds to combine the dry ingredients.  Add the butter and shortening and pulse until mixture forms a course meal.

2.  While pulsing, drizzle water over the dough until it just comes together.  The dough must not be wet or sticky.  Press the dough out into a disk and wrap it in some plastic wrap or wax paper.  Let rest in the refrigerator for at least an hour so the dough can relax.